Wow. Latest pics of ZUMWALT (DDG 1000)

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The destroyer Zumwalt is one of the most strikingly different warships ever built, in any age. Angular and stealthy, the ship’s lines are almost as different from other destroyers as the Monitor and Virginia/Merrimac were from the sailing ships of their era. In some ways, the Zumwalt’s silhouette actually harkens back to Confederate-built Civil War-era ironclads, as well as the North’s Dunderberg

The Zumwalt’s formal christening party scheduled for Oct. 19 has been postponed due to the government shutdown, but the shipbuilders up at Bath Iron Works continue to ready the ship for launching, likely to take place before the month is out.

These images were released Oct. 15 and 16. All photos courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, photography by Michael C. Nutter.

Earlier posts featuring the Zumwalt:

Mighty Zumwalt is coming together

Biggest pieces of Zumwalt come together in the night

Zumwalt deckhouse makes unplanned stop in Norfolk

The Zumwalt seen from one the shipyard's cranes.  Astern of the ship is the midbody of the Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001, for which a keel laying ceremony was held in May.

The Zumwalt seen from one the shipyard’s cranes. Astern of the ship is the midbody of the Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001, for which a keel laying ceremony was held in May.

The ship has is resplendent in new paint, put on for the christening ceremony that had been scheduled for Oct. 19, and now postponed due to the government shutdown.

The ship is resplendent in new paint, put on for the christening ceremony that had been scheduled for Oct. 19, and now postponed due to the government shutdown.

The ship rests on a wheeled system that can "translate," or move the hull from the land-level building facility into a floating drydock, from which it will be launched.

The ship rests on a wheeled system that can “translate,” or move the hull from the land-level building facility into a floating drydock, from which it will be launched.

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The ship's tumblehome hull is plainly visible in this sharp bow view. Unlike more conventional hull forms, the tumblehome hull is fuller and wider at the waterline and below than above. The ship's maximum beam is 80.7 feet on a length of 600 feet.

The ship’s tumblehome hull is plainly visible in this sharp bow view. Unlike more conventional hull forms, the tumblehome hull is fuller and wider at the waterline and below than above. The ship’s maximum beam is 80.7 feet on a length of 600 feet.

Mount 61 is open and displaying its 155 mm weapon. Mount 62 behind it is closed up. The Advanced Gun System is one ten major newly-developed technologies in the DDG 1000 design.

Mount 61 is open and displaying its 155 mm weapon. Mount 62 behind it is closed up. The Advanced Gun System is one ten major newly-developed technologies in the DDG 1000 design. Flanking the guns are the launch cells of the Peripheral Launch System, another new technology that moves the ship’s missiles from the centerline to the edge of the hull, where they also form part of the ship’s protective system.

The superstructure is virtually devoid of masts and projections. All sensors are embedded in the superstructure and hull.

A closeup of the forward superstructure. The bridge is on the lower levels; while there is only one set of windows, the interior is actually a unique two-level arrangement.

A closeup of the forward superstructure. The bridge is on the lower levels; while there is only one set of windows, the interior is actually a unique two-level arrangement.

The exceptionally narrow forward hull body is intended to slice through waves, damping down pitch action to enhance low-level signature qualities.

The exceptionally narrow forward hull body is intended to slice through waves, damping down pitch action to enhance low-level signature qualities.

A painter touches up the bow.

A painter touches up the bow.

Although there will be only three ships in the class, the DDG 1000s represent a major leap in multiple technology arenas.

Although there will be only three ships in the class, the DDG 1000s represent a major leap in multiple technology arenas.

The Zumwalt is in the midst of receiving a new paint job before she's launched. (General Dynamics Bath Iron Works photo)

The Zumwalt is in the midst of receiving a new paint job before she’s launched. (General Dynamics Bath Iron Works photo)

This view taken June 20 emphasizes the ship's sharp bow. (General Dynamics Bath Iron Works photo)

This view taken June 20 emphasizes the ship’s sharp bow. (General Dynamics Bath Iron Works photo)

Christopher P. Cavas
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Christopher P. Cavas

If it's on, over, under or around the water, I write about it. Ships and aircraft, units, tactics, leadership, strategies, acquisition, politics, industry. In the USA and around the world.
Christopher P. Cavas
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